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METRO MAGAZINE AND SCREEN EDUCATION MAGAZINE: Call for Writers and Papers

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METRO MAGAZINE AND SCREEN EDUCATION MAGAZINE

CALL FOR WRITERS/CALL FOR PAPERS

Metro and Screen Education magazines are looking for industry practitioners, teachers, academics and experienced feature writers with a proven background in film/television/ media for the following articles. They also wish to hear from anyone who has their own proposals for articles for either magazine, and academics seeking to publish papers (both magazines are refereed journals for DEST purposes). Both publications are always looking for contributors.

If you wish to contribute, contact Natalie Book at assistanteditor@ atom.org. au. PLEASE DO NOT REPLY DIRECTLY TO THIS EMAIL.

In your email, please include a pitch for the relevant article and outline any relevant experience you may have in relation to the topic. If you are a new contributor, please include a brief bio (1-5 lines) and a writing sample.

Pay rates and the style guide (now updated) for both magazines are available at http://www.metromag azine.com. au

Deadlines for the next two issues of each quarterly magazine are:

Metro 165 (June issue): 8 April 2010

Metro 166 (September issue): 30 June 2010

Screen Education 59 (July issue): 20 May 2010

Screen Education 60 (October issue): 12 August 2010

Become a fan on Facebook: http://www.facebook .com/metrofilm

Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter. com/metrofilm


METRO

The following list of article ideas is by no means exhaustive. It can be adapted, changed and, hopefully, greatly extended.

Film, television, radio, media features/reviews

· Critical analyses of/long essays on recent, new and upcoming Australian and New Zealand features, documentaries, animation, short films and new media. We are interested in pieces on single films and groups of films, including these upcoming films: Bait 3D, The Waiting City, Canetoads: The Conquest, Eliminated!, I Love You Too, Oranges and Sunshine, Wog Boy 2: Kings of Mykonos, Red Hill, Griff the Invisible, The King’s Speech, Boy

· Critical analyses/long essays on themes in Australian and New Zealand television, whether upcoming, already screened or currently screening. Examples might include advertising (:30 Seconds, The Gruen Transfer), thirtysomething drama (Tangle, Love My Way), the underworld (Underbelly, Gangs of Oz)

· Scholarly articles on international television series, including Mad Men, The Wire, Nurse Jackie, In Treatment

· The rise of 3D and its impact on Australian filmmaking/funding

· Genre in Australian or New Zealand films

· Film festival production funds – an overview

· Internet censorship in Australia – both sides of the issue, policy debate

· Digital television in Australia – what’s going on, where it is heading

· Who controls the playlists? Inside the decision-making processes at government, commercial and community stations

· Digital radio – evaluating the introduction

· ACMA – watching the watchdog

· How we get the news – impact of Facebook, Twitter on the dissemination of news stories

· The rise of the branded blog – news outlets, journals


New tendencies in Asian Cinema

· The decline of Asian cinematic theatrical release in Australia

· The present state of national cinemas, including Singapore, the Philippines and Indonesia

· Retrospectives on specific filmmakers working in the region

· Chinese directors and their negotiation of Chinese censorship laws/the recent changes in these laws

· Interviews with visiting Asian directors

· Anime

Metro is a partially refereed journal for DEST purposes and therefore we are also interested in research articles from academics on any of the above areas. If you have a proposal, please send an abstract.


Metro Regular Feature: TV Eye

‘TV Eye’ is a regular section in Metro in which we publish short opinion pieces on current Australian and overseas television programs. Submissions should be no longer than 500 words and should contain succinct and informed analyses of the chosen program, with detailed reference to particular incidents/episodes. We are also happy to consider short opinion pieces on current Australian advertisements – on TV and in other media – for this section.

Metro Special Feature Sections for 2010

Metro publishes a Special Feature section in each issue on a specific theme.

Issue 165: Landscape and Location in Australian Cinema (continued from 163, 164)

This section has already been commissioned.

Issue 166: Australia: The Movie, The Cultural Event

Baz Luhrmann’s Australia (2008) was one of Australian cinema’s most highly anticipated film events of the last decade. We are looking for papers on topics including, but not limited to:

· The representation of Indigenous Australia, particularly the Stolen Generations

· Narratives of history and nationalism

· The marketing of the film, including its link with official tourism campaigns and the power of ‘star’ drawcards

· International reception – how the film has been read overseas as an Australian filmic and cultural product

All proposals should include a detailed abstract and brief author bio. Please indicate whether you request that the article be refereed.

Books for review

Metro magazine has the following books for review. The preferred length of book reviews is between 800 and 1500 words. Unfortunately, we are unable to reply to each inquiry individually. If you do not hear from us within fourteen days, please assume the texts have all been allocated.

Michelle Arrow, Friday on Our Minds: Popular Culture in Australia Since 1945

Trisha Dunleavy, Television Drama: Form, Agency, Innovation

George Kouvaros, Paul Schrader
Richard Leonard, The Mystical Gaze of the Cinema – The Films of Peter Weir

Brian McFarlane & Deane Williams, Michael Winterbottom

Jane Mills, Loving & Hating Hollywood: Reframing Global and Local Cinemas
Lorraine Mortimer, Terror and Joy: The Films of DuĊĦan Makavejev

Catherine Simpson et al, Diasporas of Australian Cinema
Deane Williams, Australian Post-War Documentary Film: An Arc of Mirrors


SCREEN EDUCATION

Features


The following list of articles is by no means fixed. It can be adapted, changed and, hopefully, greatly extended. We are particularly interested in receiving articles that would be of use to primary teachers for media literacy and multiliteracies and those focused on teaching media at the senior secondary level.

  • Lesson plans/units of work for the media classroom (primary/secondary)
  • Changing social values: the reclassification of advertisements, films and television shows to reflect a change in public perception
  • Teaching media at the senior secondary level: classroom strategies and ideas
  • Teaching media literacy and multiliteracies in the primary classroom
  • Alternative platforms for film, e.g. mobile phones, vodcasts
  • Using magazines, zines and newspapers in the classroom
  • New trends in the media classroom and curriculum
  • Multimedia (including creating web sites and blogs), focusing on target audiences, archival functions and other aspects of new multimedia forms
  • Media and English teaching of film narratives: competition or cross-pollination?
  • Teaching storytelling skills in the primary or secondary classroom
  • Teaching technical skills in primary/secondary Media class
  • Major factors in choosing film texts for the senior secondary Media classroom – a guide to choosing the right texts

· Tools for film analysis in the senior Media and English classrooms

· Teachings guides for the following television shows: Glee, We Can Be Heroes, The Simpsons

Screen Education is a partially refereed journal for DEST purposes and therefore we are also interested in research articles from academics on areas of media teaching and learning. If you have a proposal, please send an abstract.

Film as Text

We are interested in essays on any films that are being taught as texts in the English or Media classrooms. These articles are approximately 2000-2500 words long and provide close, detailed analysis of the film’s themes and filmic techniques. We are seeking Film as Text articles on the following (bolded titles are a priority):

A Night at the Opera

Being John Malkovich

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

Careful, He Might Hear You
Chariots of Fire

The Crucible
Cry Freedom

Dead Poets Society

District 9
E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial

Ever After

Fido

Fly Away Home
Frost/Nixon

Gallipoli (directed by Peter Weir)

Great Expectations (directed by David Lean)

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?

Hamlet (directed by Kenneth Branagh)

Happy Go Lucky
The Handmaid’s Tale
High Noon

The Importance of Being Earnest (directed by Oliver Parker)

Jindabyne

Kundun

Lousy Little Sixpence

Looking for Richard

A Midsummer Night’s Dream (directed and adapted by Michael Hoffman)
Moon

The Mosquito Coast

Much Ado About Nothing (directed by Kenneth Branagh)
The NeverEnding Story

Nowhere Boy

Orlando

Persepolis

The Player

Ponyo

The Princess Bride

The Queen

Radiance

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

Samson and Delilah

Sense and Sensibility (directed by Ang Lee)
Shopgirl

Slumdog Millionaire

Synecdoche, NY
Strictly Ballroom

Ten Canoes

The Tracker

Two Hands

W.

Water

West Side Story

What’s Eating Gilbert Grape?

The Year of Living Dangerously

Yolngu Boy

Books for review

Screen Education has the following books for review. The preferred length of book reviews is between 700 and 1000 words. Unfortunately, we are unable to reply to each inquiry individually. If you do not hear from us within fourteen days, please assume the texts have all been allocated.

Michael Anderson & Miranda Jefferson, Teaching the Screen: Film Education for Generation Next

Alex Bailey, Movie Photos: The Guide to Marketing and Publicity Photography

Stuart Cunningham & Graeme Turner (eds), The Media & Communications in Australia, 3rd edn

Barrie McMahon & Robyn Quin, Advancing English Skills with Multimedia Years 7-10

Barrie McMahon & Robyn Quin, Advancing English Skills with Film Studies Years 7–10

Michael O'Shaughnessy & Jane Stadler, Media and Society, fourth edition

Jane Stadler with Kelly McWilliam, Screen Media: Analysing Film and Television


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